Final Alfred Deakin Innovation Lecture for 2007

25 June

Big Machines for Big Questions: the Australian Synchrotron and beyond.

In Australia, there is the Australian Synchrotron. In the USA, the Americans are spending $3 billion to put the successor to Hubble in space.

Why are governments investing in big machines? Do we need these machines? What questions will they answer? Will they change our lives – tomorrow, in a decade, in a century?

There are no easy answers. We’ve moved from when the laser was just a basic experiment to now being in every modern computer, car, home and factory. Over the past decade, we’ve realised that Einstein didn’t solve everything with relativity: we still need to know how the Universe works. Nor do we understand gravity yet.

We think that a particle called the Higgs boson will unite our theories – and we want to see it, which is why we need a big machine called the Large Hadron Collider.

A panel of scientists will explore these questions, including: Cathy Foley - President Australian Institute of Physics Rachel Webster - University of Melbourne astrophysicist (and Chairman-elect of the National Committee for Astronomy) Robert Lamb - Science Director, Australian Synchrotron

Time: Friday, 20 July, 6.00-7.30pm

Venue: BMW Edge, Federation Square

What's On

S M T W T F S
 
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30